Gattaca – Practice Paragraph

Question: “Describe at least one idea that changed your perspective on the film.”

In the Film Gattaca, Andrew Niccol approaches an idealistic future where humans are genetically selected to be physically flawless. Nicole explores this eugenic world that he has created through the use of symbolism, following the two main characters, Jerome and Vincent, through their struggles against the expectations that society has placed on them, determined purely by their genetic advantages and disadvantages. Genetically, Jerome is flawless and because of this, he is highly thought of and sought after in the space industry. However, this perfection has taken away any dream or ambition to achieve what society is expecting of him; to go to space. He has no drive or self-motivation to explore what may lay outside the world he knows, at least not in the way society wants. Instead, he wants to leave the world and his genetic gifts behind by ending his own life. On the other end of the spectrum, Vincent was born with a heart disorder believed to kill him before he reaches the age of 30, and is consequently not thought of as genetically fit to fulfil prestigious occupations such as those in the space industry. Although, in Vincent’s case, he was also gifted with a dream to one day go to space and the lack of societies support only further fuelled and inspired his ambition. He is willing to take any risk or make any sacrifice in order to achieve his dreams.

In the scene set in Jerome and Vincent house, Niccol directly compares Jerome and Vincent to human DNA through symbolism and visual representation. In the centre of this scene, the staircase is in the shape of a helix, a shape mirroring the structure of DNA. Through this symbolism, Niccol stimulates a question in the forefront of his audience’s eyes. Is there actually a gene for the human spirit?

The idea presented in this scene, that indeed, there is no gene for the human spirit, changed my perspective on the film. Initially, Niccol had his audience focused on the positives of eugenic society and having every person engineered to be genetically flawless. I fell prey to Niccol’s intentions and the good that lay in his modernistic idea. I was blinded and only saw the advantages that being genetically exceptional would bring. This scene made me realised that in actual fact, your ambition, dreams and goals are not predecided at your conception, and your potential in life is genetically not decided by your genes, even if it is later decided by society based on these genes. This scene illustrates that you can overcome your genetics and live a life where you decided where your genetics will lead you, and not where you genetics decide where you will go and what you can accomplish. 

Climax scene: 1.19.15

Shot 1: Long Shot – Getting in the car – High angle

Diegetic: Whir of a car

Non-diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 2: Mid Shot  – Vincent calling Eugene – Low angle 

Diegetic: NA

Non-Diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: Vincent: “Come on, come on, come on”

Shot 3: Mid shot/close up – Eugene hands scraping – Level angle

Diegetic: Phone ringing

Non diegetic: Suspense music – fades out when Jerome starts talking. 

Dialogue: Eugene: “Hello?”

Shot 4: Mid shot – Vincent calling Eugene – Low angle

Diegetic: NA

Non diegetic: NA

Dialogue: Vincent: “Eugene, I need you to be yourself for the day.”

Shot 5: Eugene – Mid shot – Level angle

Diegetic: Dialogue

Non diegetic: NA

Dialogue: Eugene: “I was never very good at it remember!”

Shot 6: Vincent – Mid shot – Low angle

Diegetic: Dialogue

Non diegetic: NA

Dialogue: Vincent: “The investigators are coming by, I am supposed to sick.”

Shot 7: Eugene on phone – Close up – Level angle

Diegetic: Dialogue & VIncent putting down the phone 

Non diegetic: NA

Dialogue: Vincent: “So you keep telling me. How long have I got?”

Shot 8: Vincent – Mid shot – Low angle

Diegetic: NA

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 9: Eugene stairs – Long shot – Low angle

Diegetic: Wheelchair noises.

Non diegetic: Suspense music.

Dialogue: NA

Shot 10: Eugene looking up – Mid shot – High angle

Diegetic: Dialogue

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 11: Eugene on floor – Long shot – Level angle

Diegetic: Wheelchair noises

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: Eugene: “Urrrrrgrh”

Shot 12: Car – Long shot – Level angle

Diegetic: Car driving past noises. Leaves rustling from car air disturbance.

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 13: Eugene going up stairs- Long shot – High angle

Diegetic: Eugene thumping up stairs & heavy breathing and grunting.

Non diegetic: Suspense music. 

Dialogue: NA

Shot 14: Eugene – Long shot – Bird’s eye view

Diegetic: Eugene thumping up stairs & heavy breathing and grunting.

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 15: Irene and Anton – Two shot – Level angle

Diegetic: Car sound

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 16: Eugene hand on stairs – Close up – Level angle

Diegetic: Eugene thumping up stairs & heavy breathing and grunting.

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 17: Eugene feet on stairs – Close up – Level

Diegetic: Eugene thumping up stairs.

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 18: Car – Long shot – Level angle

Diegetic: Car sounds

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 19: Eugene on stairs – Long shot  – Level angle

Diegetic: Eugene thumping up stairs.

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 20: Car – Long shot – Level angle

Diegetic: Car sounds.

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 21: Eugene hand – Close up – Low angle

Diegetic: Eugene thumping up stairs and grunting.

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 22: Stairs – Close up – Point of view

Diegetic: Eugene thumping up stairs 

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 23: Car – Long shot – Level angle

Diegetic: Car whirring sounds & car break sounds. 

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 24: Eugene stairs – long shot – Low angle

Diegetic: Eugene thumping up stairs.

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 25: Car park – Long Shot – High/Level angle

Diegetic: Anton and Irene walking sounds & door buzzer. 

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 26: Eugene stairs – Long Shot – Low angle

Diegetic: Eugene thumping up stairs & grunting.

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 27: Eyes – Closeup – Low angle

Diegetic: Eugene thumping  & door buzzer

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 28: Anton and Irene – Two Shot – Level angle

Diegetic: NA

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 29: Eugene top of stairs – Mid Shot 

Diegetic: Eugene thumping up stairs 

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 30: Anton and Irene – Two Shot 

Diegetic: NA

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: Irene: “I guess he’s not home.”

Shot 31: Fingers buzzer – Close up

Diegetic: Eugene pushing the button

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 32: Anton and Irene – Two Shot

Diegetic: NA

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: Eugene (through the buzzer): Hello? Anton (replying): I’m here to see Jerome Morrow.

Shot 33: Fingers – Close up 

Diegetic: NA

Non diegetic: NA

Dialogue: Eugene: “Yes, that’s me, come up.”

Shot 34: Eugene on the floor – Longshot

Diegetic: Eugene falling into ground. 

Non diegetic: NA

Dialogue: NA

Shot 35: Anton and Irene – Two Shot

Diegetic: Anton and Irene walking.

Non diegetic: NA

Dialogue: Anton: “I guess he’s home”.

Shot 36: Eugene – longshot – 

Diegetic: Eugene pulling along floor + getting up on chair. Anton and Irene entering. 

Non diegetic: NA

Dialogue: NA

Shot 37: Eugene chair – mid shot – level angle

Diegetic: 

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: Eugene: “Come in”.

Shot 38: Anton and Irene doorway – Longshot

Diegetic: 

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 39: Irene – Mid Shot

Diegetic: Irene’s footsteps

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 40: Eugene  – Mid shot – level angle

Diegetic: NA

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: Eugene: “Where’s my kiss?”

Shot 41: Anton – Close up – level angle

Diegetic: NA

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 42: Irene – Mid shot – level angle

Diegetic: NA

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: Irene: “Good to see you are feeling better.”

Shot 43: Living room all three – Longshot – level angle

Diegetic: Irene’s footsteps walking to Eugene.

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: Eugene: Of course – know that you’re here.

Shot 44: Irene & Eugene – Two shot – level angle

Diegetic: Subtle kissing sound.

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 45: Anton – Mid shot – level angle

Diegetic: NA

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: NA

Shot 46: Irene and Eugene – Two Shot – level angle

Diegetic: Irene moving away and sitting down. 

Non diegetic: Suspense music

Dialogue: Eugene: “Who’s your friend?” “How can I help?” Irene: “It’s about the director.” Eugene: “Oh, again?”

Shot 47: Anton – Long shot 

Shot 48: Irene – Close up

Shot 49: Anton – Close up

Shot 50: Eugene – Close up

Shot 51: Irene – Close up

Shot 52: Anton – Mid shot

Shot 53: Eugene arm – Close up

Shot 54: 

Shakespeare’s Macbeth – Act 2

Act 2, Scene 1:

Characters: Macbeth, Banquo, Macbeth, Fleance

Location: A court within the castle

Time: Around midnight/early morning

Events: Banquo and Macbeth talk around midnight/1am. They talk about the witches  (three weird sisters). Macbeth says that he has not been worrying nor thinking of the witches at all, and stresses the point that he is loyal to Duncan. When Macbeth is left alone, a vision of a bloody dagger comes to him, which is a reference to his ambitions to kill Macbeth.

Quotes: 

Act 1, Scene 2:

Characters: Macbeth, Lady Macbeth

Location: A court within the castle.

Time: Once Macbeth has slain Duncan

Events: Macbeth returns from slaying King Duncan. Macbeth tells Lady Macbeth how appalled he is of his actions and the crime he has committed. He speaks of how he thought that he heard a voice speaking to him, and how he believes that he has been cursed as a consequence of his crime. He deviated from the plan and forgot to leave the daggers with the drunken guards, instead, he carried them back to Lady Macbeth with him. Lady Macbeth is ashamed of her husband’s refusal to put the daggers with the guard and smear them with Duncan’s blood to make it appear as if they were the ones guilty of the Kings death.

Quotes: 

Macbeth: “Wake Duncan with thy knocking: I wish thou couldst!” In this quote, Macbeth is saying that he wishes that the knocking that they are hearing in the scene had the power to wake Duncan. I think that he has used the word wake because in those times, it was very much the common belief that God had taken Duncan, and that he was simply asleep in God’s kingdom, hence the use of the word wake instead of perhaps, resurrect. 

Lady Macbeth: “My hands are of your color, but I shame// To wear a heart so white.” In this quote, Macbeth is saying that her hands bear the same amount of blood as Macbeth, yet she would be ashamed to be so weak as he. 

Macbeth: “Will all great Neptune’s ocean wash this blood// Clean from my hand? No, this is my hand will rather// The multitudinous seas incarnadine,// Making the green one red.” In this quote, Macbeth is saying that even the great ocean of Neptune could not wash away the blood and the guilt that marks his soul, but instead, he would turn the water red with the blood on his hands and the sins and guilt on his conscience. He is saying that no matter what, he has been tainted and scarred for life and his sins will always be with him. 

Act 2, Scene 3:

Characters: Porter, Macduff, Lenox, Macbeth, Lady Macbeth, Banquo, Donalbain, Malcolm.

Location: A court within the castle

Time: After Macbeth and Lady Macbeth talk about the killing of King Duncan.

Events: After Macbeth enters and is asked by Macduff whether the King is awake, and Macbeth replies unsure but believes he is still asleep, Macduff goes to the Kings chamber to discover himself. With a distressed cry, he returns and announces that the King has died. Malcolm and Donalbain discuss that they are no longer safe and decide to leave the country. Malcolm decides that he will go to South England while Donalabin goes to Ireland.

Quotes: 

Act 2, Scene 4:

Characters: Old Man, Rosse, Macduff

Location: Outside the King’s castle

Time: In the morning

Events: Talk has it between Macduff and Rosse that Malcolm and Donalbain, King Duncan’s two sons, paid and bribed the two guards posted outside King Duncan’s room on the night he was killed to kill him. They also talk about how Macbeth has been named the successor of the throne after Duncan and procedures to make this happen are already underway. 

Quotes:

Old Man: “T’is unnatural,// Even like the deed that’s done. On Tuesday last,// A falcon, towering in her pride of place, Was by a mousing owl hawked at, and killed.” This quote is extremely important as it is a reference to the beliefs of the time period. The Old Man is saying that last Tuesday, majestic and powerful falcon was taken down and killed by a weak owl. At this time, and it is still continued today in films and books, is the belief that the natural world responds to an upcoming tragedy. It is not normal for a weak owl to take down a powerful falcon, which is an example of the natural world acting in accordance to the imminence of the Kings death.

Rosse: And Duncan’s horses, (a thing most strange and certain)//Beauteous and swift, the minions of their race,// Turned wild in nature, broke their stalls, flung out// Contending ‘gainst obedience, as they would make War with mankind. This quote is also very significant as it is another example and reference to the beliefs at the time period. In this quote, Rosse is saying that the Kings horses, a calm and obedient breed and the best of their type, became feral and wild, and ate each other, the complete contrast of their usual nature. This is another example of how the natural world acting in accordance to the imminence of the Kings death, a common belief of the time period.

Macduff: “Lest our old robes sit easier than our new.” In this quote, Macduff is saying that he has doubts in Macbeths rule. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shakespeare’s Macbeth – Act 1

Shakespeares Macbeth

Act 1, Scene 1:

Characters: The three witches

Location: A desert place

Time: (Unknown) Before the end of the battle

Events: The witches plan to meet again once the battle has ended with Macbeth upon the heath.

Quote: 

All (witches): “Fair is foul, and foul is fair.”

Act 1, Scene 2:

Characters: King Duncan, Captain, Malcolm (Kings Son)

Location: Camp near Forres

Time:

Events: A wounded soldier tells his tales of the past battle. He tells of how Macbeth (King’s cousin) kills the rebel MacDonwald (fighting for the Norwegians). MacBeth’s bravery is praised. The Norweigan’s staged a huge comeback with reloaded weapons and new men. Scotland’s army appeared to be not so skilled as the Norweigeners. Scottish decided that the dead Norweigan soldiers were not allowed to be removed from the battlefield to be buried without a payment of $10,000 to the Scottish. Macbeth is entitled to the castle, land and everything that MacDonwald owned for being responsible for his death. 

Quote: 

Captain: “Disdaining fortune, with his brandished steel, which smoked with bloody execution. Like Valours minion, carved out his passage,”

Captain: “As two spent swimmer, that cling together and choke their art.”

Act 1, Scene 3:

Characters: 3 witches, Macbeth, Banquo, Rosse, Angus.

Location: Upon the heath, the agreed meeting place from Scene 1. 

Time: Once the battle has been lost and won.

Events: Witch one talks about her plan to stop a sailor from achieving a successful voyage because his wife had been rude to her. The witches predict Macbeth’s future, hailing him as the Thane of Cawdor and ‘shalt and king hereafter.” They also predict the future of Banquo, and tell him that he himself will not become King, although his descendants will be. Macbeth is told of the news that he has been titled the Thane of Cawdor by the arrival of Rosse and Angus, because of his bravery demonstrated in the battle by killing MacDonwald. This is met by confusion as the old Thane of Cawdor still lives, but also speculation towards the witches predictions seeing as their first one has come true. 

Quotes:

Macbeth: “The Thane of Cawdor lives: why dress me in borrowed robes?”

Demonstrating Macbeth’s confusion that he has been crowned the Thane of Cawdor.

Macbeth: “If chance will have me King, why, Chance may crown me, Without my stir.

Referring to fate: Macbeth is saying that if he is destined to become king, then he will let destiny take his course without interfering. 

Banquo: “And oftentimes, to win us to our harm, the instruments of Darkness tell us truths, Win us with honest trifles, to betrays, In deepest consequence. 

Instruments of Darkness: Witches 

Banquo is warning Macbeth that the witches may have been telling him the first truth, that he will become the Thane of Cawdor, in order to gain his trust. He worries that the witches other two predictions may be a lie to stir trouble. 

Act 1, Scene 4:

Characters: Duncan, Malcolm, Banquo, Macbeth

Location: Forres, a room in the Kings Palace.

Time: After the witches make predictions for Banquo and Macbeth.

Events: Duncan personally thanks Macbeth for his valiant efforts in the bottle where he slew Macdonwald. The old Thane of Cawdor’s execution has now taken place. Malcolm publicly announces that Duncan, now the Prince of Cumberland, will be his heir. 

Quotes: 

Macbeth: “The Prince of Cumberland! – That is a step// On which I must fall down, or else o’erlap, // For in my way it lies. Stars, hide your fires! Let not light see my black and deep desires. The eye wink at hand, yet let that be, Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see.” He says that the Prince of Cumberland will be his downfall, or otherwise he will overcome him because he lies between himself and the throne. Fate, hide my actions and let not everyone see my evil thoughts and desires (let the darkness hide my actions). Let me blindly do what I must, so that my eyes can stay innocent to the actions that they fear. 

Act 1, Scene 5:

Characters: Macbeth, Lady Macbeth, Messenger, 

Location: A room in Macbeth’s castle.

Time: After Malcolm was crowned Prince of Cumberland and pronounced heir to the throne. 

Events: Lady Macbeth reads a letter addressed to her from her husband telling her of the witches prophecies. She reflects that Macbeth is too kind to perform such a deed. A messenger comes to tell her about the King’s arrival and she plans to take control of the situation and kill the king for Macbeth. She says she wants to be “unsexed” because woman in that time were thought of as un-capable. She says that she has no compunctions so her conscience wouldn’t get in her way. Macbeth comes and tells her of the Kings stay, she says to him to leave the deed to her. 

Quotes: 

Lady Macbeth: “That tent on moral thoughts, unsex me here and fill me from the crown to the toe, top-full of direst cruelty!”  Take away my feminity to the deed.

Lady Macbeth: Yet I do fear thy nature; it is too full o’ the milk of human kindness to catch the nearest way.” She fears that her husband is to weak and kind to fulfill the deed of killing the King.

Lady Macbeth: Art not without ambition, but without the illness should attend it: what thou wouldst highly. Though he is not without ambition.

Lady Macbeth: Look like an innocent flower, But be the serpent under’t. Appear peaceful on the outside, but on the inside, be the serpent who commits the awful deeds.)

MUY IMPORTANTE:

Come, you spirits// That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here,//And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full//Of direst cruelty! make thick my blood:// Stop up the access and passage to remorse,// That no compunctious visitings of nature// Shake my fell nor keep peace between// The effect and it! Come to woman’s breasts,// And take my milk for gall, you murdering ministers,// Wherever in your slightness substances,//You wait on natures mischief! Come, thick night,// And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell,// That my keen knife see not the wound it makes.//Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark,//To cry ‘Hold, hold!’.

Act 1, Scene 6:

Characters: Duncan, Banquo, Lady Macbeth

Location: Outside Macbeth’s castle.

Time: After Macbeth and Lady Macbeth talk. 

Events: Duncan arrives at the King’s castle and is welcomed by Lady Macbeth. They discuss Macbeth before proceeding inside. 

Act 1, Scene 7:

Characters: Macbeth & Lady Macbeth

Location: A room in Macbeth’s castle.

Time: After Duncan arrives at the King’s castle and is greeted by Macbeth.

Events: Lady Macbeth and Macbeth talk about their plan to kill Duncan. Macbeth is having seconds thoughts and doubting his role in their plan. Lady Macbeth is appalled with her husbands’ doubts and calls him a coward and tells him he is too weak to follow through with his promise. She says that if she made a promise, she would follow through with it no matter what happens or what she may have to sacrifice. Lady Macbeth succeeds with convincing Macbeth to continue with the plan. She tells him of her plan to make Duncan’s guards drunk enough that they pass out, and then Macbeth will Duncan with the guard’s swords. Everyone will suspect that the guards were responsible for killing the King, and seeing as they were unconscious, they would neither be able to confirm nor deny whether this was true. Lady Macbeth and Macbeth will grieve for Duncan like everyone else to disguise the awful crime that they committed. 

Quotes: 

Lady Macbeth: Does unmake you. I have given suck, and know//How tender ‘t is to love the babe that milks me://I would, while it was smiling in my face,//Have plucked my nipple from his boneless gums,//And dashed the brains out, had I sworn as you//have done to this. In this quote, Lady Macbeth is saying that if she had made a promise like Macbeth had, she would do it no matter what. She would even tear the baby that she has nurtured and loved from her breasts and smash his head open, letting his brains spill out, if she had promised to do so. 

Shakespeare’s Macbeth – Act 5

Act 5, Scene 1:

Characters: Doctor, Gentlewoman, Lady Macbeth

Location: Dunsinane,  a room in the castle.

Events: Lady Macbeth has become crazy and now, every night, she sleepwalks around the house. Tonight, the doctor and a gentlewoman are watching her spectacle. She feels guilty for the murders of Lady Macduff and her children. She appears to be “washing the blood off her hands” and believes that no amount of scrubbing will make it come off. The people witnessing the conversation are horrified because they have learned something they shouldn’t have, that she has killed several people before. They can now assume that the death of Duncan was at the hands of Lady Macbeth and her husband, Macbeth. 

Quote:

Lady Macbeth: “Here’s the smell of the blood still. All the perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand. Oh, Oh, Oh!” This quote is similar to the one spoken by Macbeth earlier in the play after he killed Duncan, when he was consumed by the guilt of his sin. He believed that no matter how much washing of his hands he could do, his hands would never become clean. This is funny because Lady Macbeth shamed Macbeth for his cowardice and guilt following the death of Macbeth.

Macbeths quote (earlier in the play): Will all the water in the ocean wash this blood from my hands? No, instead my hands will stain the seas scarlet, turning the green waters red.

Lady Macbeth: “Out damned spot! Out,  I say”

Act 5, Scene 2:

Characters: Menteith, Angus, Caithness, Lennox

Location: Dunsinane, a room in the castle.

Events: Malcolm, leading the English army, are marching to meet with the Scottish army to fight Macbeth. Macbeth is rapidly trying to get his military forces under control and organised as the imminent battle approaches. 

Quote: 

Cathness: “Great Dunsinane he strongly fortifies. Some say he’s mad: others, that lesser hate him,// Do call it valiant fury; but, for certain,// He cannot buckle his distempered cause, Within the belt of rule.”

Act 5, Scene 3:

Characters: Macbeth, Servant, Seyton, Doctor. 

Location: Dunsinane, a room in the castle. 

Events: The English army, led by Malcolm, and Scottish rebels are gathering in Birnam Wood preparing to fight Macbeth. Macbeth, meanwhile, is in his castle nearby and does not hold any fear due to the prophecy previously given to him by the witches, that none of woman born can kill him. He hears from his servant that an army 10,000 strong are gathering against him, and he asks for his amour, adamant that he will stand and fight until the flesh is hacked off his bones if it comes to that. They also speak of Lady Macbeth and her current unstable state of mind, and Macbeth asks the doctor to cure his wife. 

Quotes

Macbeth: If thou couldst, doctor, cast
The water of my land, find her disease,
Macbeth referring to the trouble that is plaguing his kingdom, yet he fails to recognise that he his at the heart of his countries problems. 
Act 5, Scene 4:
Characters:
Location:
Events:
Quotes:
Macbeth: 
She should have died hereafter.
There would have been a time for such a word.
Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow,
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
To the last syllable of recorded time,
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.
Talking fo despair. He has everything he could possibly want, even though his wife has died. He now belives his life to have no meaning. (May use for soliloquy.) 

 

 

Shakespeare’s Macbeth – Act 4

Act 4, Scene 1:

Characters: The witches, Hecate, Macbeth

Location:  A dark cavern. A boiling cauldron lies in the middle of the cave.

Events: The witches concoct a boiling potion in the centre of the dark cavern. Macbeth enters the cave and approaches the witches and Hecate. Macbeth demands to know the truth about his prophecies. The witches present to Macbeth 3 new prophecies by presenting to him horrifying apparitions. Number 1: A floating head – to warn him to be wary of Macduff.                                   Number 2: A bloodied child – “None of woman born/shall hurt Macbeth.”               This was intended that Macbeth would believe himself to be invincible, seeing as nobody born of a woman would be able to hurt him.                                      Number 3: A crowned child holding a tree – the child tells Macbeth that he will not be defeated until Birnam Wood marches to fight him at Dunsinane Hill. 

Quotes:

Apparition 1:

Macbeth! Macbeth! Macbeth! Beware Macduff.
Beware the thane of Fife. Dismiss me. Enough.
Macbeth! Be aware of the Thane of Fife, Macduff. 

Apparition 2:

Be bloody, bold, and resolute. Laugh to scorn
The power of man, for none of woman born
Shall harm Macbeth.
No one born of a woman can harm Macbeth. This gives Macbeth the false apprehension of invincibility, which the witches will hope will cause him to act rash and recklessly. 

Apparition 3:

“Macbeth shall never vanquished be until
Great Birnam Wood to high Dunsinane Hill
Shall come against him.”
No one will be able to defeat Macbeth until Birnam Wood will march to fight him at Dunsinane hill. Macbeth replies: 

Macbeth:

That will never be.
Who can impress the forest, bid the tree
Unfix his earthbound root? Sweet bodements! Good!
Rebellious dead, rise never till the wood
Of Birnam rise, and our high-placed Macbeth
Shall live the lease of nature, pay his breath
To time and mortal custom.
How could that ever happen? Who can command the forest to uproot itseld to come and fight me? Good, I will reign King forever. 

Macbeth:

Yet my heart
Throbs to know one thing. Tell me, if your art
Can tell so much: shall Banquo’s issue ever
Reign in this kingdom?
My heart still yearns to know one thing. Can you foresee if the children of Banquo will ever reign King of this land?

Act 4, Scene 2:

Characters: Lady Macduff, her Son, Rosse, Messenger, Murderers

Location: Macduff’s castle

Events: Lady Macduff and Rosse talk, and Lady Macduff demands for Rosse to tell her why her husband has fled from her and their son. Rosse tells Lady Macduff that her husband did the right thing due to what was happening at the moment. Lady Macduff tells her son that his father is dead, but he refuses to believe his mothers’ word. A messenger arrives in the scene and urges Lady Macduff to flee as she is believed to be in danger. Shortly after, a murdered also arrives and proclaims that Macduff is a traitor. Macduff’s son does not believe his father has done anything wrong and tells the murderer he is a liar. The murderer stabs the little boy and Lady Macduff flees with the murderer on her heels. 

Quotes:
Lady Macduff: 

 For the poor wren,
The most diminutive of birds, will fight,
Her young ones in her nest, against the owl.
Lady Macbeth is referring to her husband, Macduff, when she says the even  the wren, the smallest of birds will stand and fight to protect her young from the fiercest owl.
I am in this earthly world, where to do harm
Is often laudable, to do good sometime
Accounted dangerous folly.
I am on this earth where doing harm and evil is often praised, but to sometimes do good is thought of as foolish. 
Act 4, Scene 3:
Characters: Malcolm, Macduff, Doctor, Rosse
Location: Outside King Edward’s castle
Events: Macduff arrives in England, wanting Malcolm to return home to Scottland with him to join him in his fight to overthrow Macbeth’s rule. Malcolm is suspicious of where Macduffs intentions and loyalty lies, and proceeds to tell a series of lies to measure where his intentions in wanting him to return to Scottland is stemmed from and where his true loyalty lies. He finally determines that Macduff that Macduff is not loyal to Macbeth, and he decides that he is willing to ally his army with Macduff to fight Macbeth and take him dooouuwwwnn! 
Macduff is alerted of his families brutal murder back home in Scottland, and weighed down with guilt, he prepares to invade and attack Macbeth alongside Malcolm.
Quotes:
Malcolm:
I think our country sinks beneath the yoke.
It weeps, it bleeds, and each new day a gash
Is added to her wounds.
Referring to Macbeths rule over Scottland.

Macbeth Act 3

Act 3, Scene 1:

Characters: Banquo, Macbeth, Lady Macbeth

Location: 

Time:

Events: Banquo expresses his suspicion in what Macbeth will do next. He says that the first two of the witches prophecies have come true, so the third, which says that the crown will not go to Macbeth’s descendants, nor Banquo, but the descendants of Banquo, must have to come true aswell.  Macbeth enters the scene and begins to converse with Banquo. He invites Banquo to dinner that night, and after thanking Macbeth, Banquo states that he is going riding this afternoon and will not be home until after dusk but should still be able to make the party. Upon Banquo’s departure, Macbeth speaks with two murderers that he has hired and gets assurance from them that are willing to murder Banquo and his son, Fleance. He then orders them to wait inside the castle to await further orders. 

Quotes:

Macbeth:

To be thus is nothing,
But to be safely thus. Our fears in Banquo
Stick deep, and in his royalty of nature
Reigns that which would be feared. ‘Tis much he dares,
And to that dauntless temper of his mind
He hath a wisdom that doth guide his valor
To act in safety. There is none but he
Whose being I do fear, and under him
My genius is rebuked, as it is said
Mark Antony’s was by Caesar. He chid the sisters
When first they put the name of king upon me
And bade them speak to him. Then, prophetlike,
They hailed him father to a line of kings.
Upon my head they placed a fruitless crown
And put a barren scepter in my grip,
Thence to be wrenched with an unlineal hand,
No son of mine succeeding. If ’t be so,
For Banquo’s issue have I filed my mind;
For them the gracious Duncan have I murdered;
Put rancors in the vessel of my peace
Only for them; and mine eternal jewel
Given to the common enemy of man,
To make them kings, the seed of Banquo kings!
Rather than so, come fate into the list,
And champion me to th’ utterance. Who’s there?
This is a very important soliloquy by Macbeth, in which he speaks of the Banquo and the witches prophecies introduced at the start of the play. 

“There is none but he, Whose being I do fear,” in this extract from Macbeth’s soliloquy, he expresses his fear for Banquo, because according to the prophecies, he is the father of a line of Kings that will succeed Macbeth. Macbeth’s flourishing desire for power leads him to this fear of Banquo and his sons, as he knows that in order for the third prophecy to come true, he will have to die. He speaks of everything he has done to ensure that the prophecies have come true, including the murder of the late King Duncan who he was once loyal to. In the quote, “Rather than so, come fate into the list,//And champion me to th’ utterance.”, Macbeth is saying that he will not sit by and spectate Banquo’s children succeed the throne, but instead, he will meddle with fate and attempt to stop the third prophecy coming true by killing Banquo and his only son Fleance. 

Act 3, Scene 2:

Characters: Macbeth, Lady Macbeth, Servant

Location:

Time:

Events: Macbeth speaks to his wife, Lady Macbeth of his concern that Banquo and his son Fleance still live. Lady Macbeth questions what he is going to do about it, and Macbeth replies by saying she will have to wait and see and celebrate when it is done. 

Quotes:

Macbeth:
Light thickens, and the crow
Makes wing to th’ rooky wood.
Good things of day begin to droop and drowse;
Whiles night’s black agents to their preys do rouse
Macbeth is referring to Banquo’s imminent death. He is talking about how the night is approaching and how the “nights black agents”, a reference to the two murderers that he has hired to kill Banquo, that are setting off to find and kill Banquo. 
Act 3, Scene 3:
Characters: 1st, 2nd, 3rd murderes, Banquo, Fleance (silent)
Location: In the woods outside the Macbeths castle.
Time:
Events: The murderers that Macbeth has hired lay awaiting in the woods outside Macbeths castle. Banquo and Fleance appear on their horses and are ambushed by the murderers. Banquo cries out to his son Fleance to save himself, and then is quickly killed. Fleance manages to escape the murder alive and physically unharmed. The murderers leave the scene to seek Macbeth and notify him of the death of Banquo and the escape of Fleance. 

Quotes:

Banquo:

O treachery! Fly, good Fleance, fly, fly, fly!
Thou may ’st revenge —O slave!
These are some of Banquos last words, and he speaks of the treachery being committed by his murder and pleads for his son Fleance to escape and seek revenge for his death.
2nd Murderer:
We have lost best half of our affair.
In this quote, the second murderer is saying how with the escape of Fleance, they have failed their mission. This is because it is Fleance and his descendants that is prophesized to succeed the throne from Macbeth, and not Banquo. 
Act 3, Scene 4:
Characters: Macbeth, Lords, Lady Macbeth, 1st Murderer, Lennox, Ross
Location:
Time:
Events: Macbeth and Lady Macbeth enter the court as King and Queen. One of the murderers comes to the door to speak to Macbeth and tells him of the night’s events. Macbeth is greatly disappointed that Fleance managed to escape as it means that his position on the throne is still threatened. He returns to the dinner table, where much to his surprise, he finds the ghost of Banquo sitting in his seat awaiting him. It appears that it is only Macbeth who sees the ghost, so for the guests in the hall, Macbeth’s spectacle created by his shock and surprise is quite alarming. Lady Macbeth attempts to explain her husbands’ actions, but eventually sends the alarmed guests out of the room as Macbeth’s spectacle continues. 
Quotes:

Macbeth:

There the grown serpent lies. The worm that’s fled
Hath nature that in time will venom breed;
No teeth for th’ present. Get thee gone. Tomorrow
We’ll hear ourselves again.
In this quote, Macbeth is referring to Fleance. He is saying that at the moment Fleance is harmless to him but in time, he will become dangerous and a threat to Macbeth’s position on the throne. 
Act 3, Scene 5:
Characters: Hecate and the witches
Time:
Location: Upon the heath.
Events: The 3 witches meet with the goddess of witchcraft, Hecate, upon the ‘heath’. Hecate is not pleased that the witches had gifted prophecies to Macbeth without consulting Hecate.  She orders that Macbeth will be presented with visions on his next appearance, that will amplify his confusion of his futur.e
Quotes: 
Hecate:

He shall spurn fate, scorn death, and bear
His hopes ‘bove wisdom, grace, and fear.
And you all know, security
Is mortals’ chiefest enemy.
This is a powerful quote from Hecate prophesizing Macbeth’s deterioration in his state of mind. She says that:
He shall have a false sense of security and believe that he is greater than fate, widsom and fear. She says that security is a mans worst enemy. 

Act 3, Scene 6: 

Characters: Lennox, Lord
Time:
Location: Forres. The palace. 
Events: Lennox and the Lord talk of Banquo’s death, and how Fleance has officially been named the murderer of his father. Both the Lord and Lennox suspect Macbeth for the murders of the late King Duncan and Banquo, and discuss their hope that Macduff and his plans will be able to save all of Scottland from Macbeth’s fate. 
Quotes: 

Analytical Metaphoric Paragraph

Point:  Shakespeare uses forceful metaphors and personifications to flaunt Macbeth’s malevolent desires and ambitions

Example: Macbeth speaks aside to the audience expressing his thoughts on King Duncan’s latest announcement that his son, Malcolm is hereafter pronounced Prince of Cumberland – the heir to the throne.

(Aside) The Prince of Cumberland! – That is a step// On which I must fall down, or else o’erleap,// For in my way it lies. Stars, hide your fires!// Let not light see my black and deep desires;// The eye wink at the hand, yet let that be,// Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see. /–/

Analysis:

In this passage spoken by Macbeth, he expresses his ‘deep and dark desires’ in which he wishes to kill Malcolm, King Duncan’s successor to the throne. This is illustrated through the use of metaphors and personifications.  This piece of information embeds an implication in the storyline because we as an audience, are now aware of Macbeth’s tenebrous intents and desires to kill Malcolm and ultimately King Duncan, whereas the characters living in the play are blissfully unaware of this prospect. Macbeth illustrates his recognition that Malcolm stands in the way of him successing the throne by saying, The Prince of Cumberland! – That is a step// On which I must fall down, or else o’erleap,// For in my way it lies. When Macbeth’s says, “That is a step on which I must fall down, or else o’erleap”, he is saying that Malcolm, the Prince of Cumberland will be his downfall, or otherwise he will have to overcome him. 

In this extract from the passage, we are alerted as an audience of Macbeth’s morbid intendments when he says, Stars, hide your fires!// Let not light see my black and deep desires; In this extract spoken by Macbeth, he is asking fate to hide his actions, and mask his “dark and deep” desires.

“The eye wink at the hand, yet let that be,// Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see. ” Finally, in this last extract from this very important passage spoken by Macbeth, he says let my hand blindly do what it must (without me looking), but carry out acts that my eyes will fear to see when completed. 

Macbeth’s ambitions expressed by Shakespeare in this passage are in stark contrast to the Macbeth we knew prior to this passage. In Act 1, Scene 3, when the witches have made their prophecies that Macbeth will become King, he says, “If chance will have me King, why, Chance may crown me, Without my stir.” In this extract, Macbeth is saying that if fate has him destined to become King, then he will let fate run it’s course and not interfere. From this extract, you begin to associate a passive, gentle and patient character to Macbeth’s name, one that is not fazed whether he succeeds the crown. This character we have created is rapidly murdered in the first passage I analyzed, when his “deep and dark” desires are expressed to kill Duncan.

 

Our transcript: Me, Ava, Ruby

Ava: Mmmmm(repeated consonant sound – emphasizing that she is delighted by the prospect of having ‘peta’ bread for lunch), I’ve got ‘peta’ bread for lunch, yay!

Emily: ‘Pita’ (raised voice on ‘Pita’ to reinforce pronunciation) bread!

Ava: Nooo(repeated vowel sound – emphasizing that she is horrified that I Emily would use such pronunciation), ‘peta’ (raised voice on ‘peta’ to reinforce pronunciation) bread.

Emily: It’s not ‘peta’ (raised voice on ‘peta’ bread to reinforce pronunciation) bread.

Ava: Yeeesss (repeated vowel and consonant sound – added emphasis)!

Ruby: Do we say, whad, whad (interpreted pronunciation of her Canadian accent) do New Zealanders say?

Ava: ‘pe’, ‘peta’(Fluctuating tones of voice to exclaim opinion)  (Emily: pita)

Ava: Nooo (repetition of vowel sounds to accentuate the statement)!

Ruby: ‘peta’(raised voice on ‘peta’ to reinforce pronunciation).

Emily: ‘pita’(raised voice on ‘pita’ to reinforce pronunciation.).

Ruby:  Oh, ‘p’, ‘pita’s kinda weird Emily.(Passive voice to portray a friendly persona)

Emily: it’s ‘pi’, no, it’s (Ava: Yeah, its like) yeah it’s like ‘pita’, it’s not ‘peeta’

Ava (Agenda setting): You say, you say ‘baysil’(Emphasis on ‘bay’ to reinforce pronunciation).

Ruby: Yeeeeesssss(accentuation and repetition of ‘eeesss’ to make a strong exclamation)! It sounds (Ava: No it’s basil.)  so much better

Emily: No, but that would be “Bayyyyyyyyyyysil” (Ruby: No, no)

Ava(Agenda setting): Don’t you say, ‘pasta’?

Emily: No! Paaasta (Repetition of vowel sound to exaggerate and reinforce pronunciation).

Ruby: I say paaaasta (Repetition of vowel sound to exaggerate and reinforce pronunciation).

Ava: Ok, good.

Emily: My Dad says ‘grass(Emphasis on ‘ass’ to reinforce pronunciation).

Ava: (evil choke laugh).

Ruby:  (chuckles)

Emily: I’m gonna mow the ‘grass(Emphasis on ‘ass’ to reinforce pronunciation), and,

Ruby: Graaasss  (Repetition of vowel sound to emphasize pronunciation) 

Emily: Let’s do, let’s um, let’s draw a ‘graph’ (Emphasis on ‘aph’ to emphasize pronunciation) .

Ruby: A‘graph’ (Emphasis on ‘aph’ to emphasize pronunciation) .

Ava: No its, (Emily: No it’s graaaaaph)

Ruby: Oh no!

Ava: I say, graph.

Ruby: I say graph too.

Emily: It’s not GRAPH, that’s so naff.

Ruby: Graaaaph is just so.. (Emily: GRAPH), ya know. (Emily: GRAPH) english.

Emily(Back tracking): Peeeeta, peeta no, it’s(Ava: Yes)

 

To be continued………………………..